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Chase Sexton on getting advice from Chad Reed and James Stewart

Chase Sexton on getting advice from Chad Reed and James Stewart
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We asked an in-form Chase Sexton, who took second at Foxborough, what it was like to work with Chad Reed and James Stewart in the last year, with Sexton in a unique position in spending time with two of the supercross greats, who were both very different in how they got the job done!

You’ve worked with James Stewart and Chad Reed, at least rode with Chad a little bit this year. How does their advice compare and what’s the biggest thing you’ve taken away from those two? Their mentality racing each other was quite different and their styles. Do they give you different advice?

Working with James last year was cool. He taught me some stuff. I used to stand up a lot more. I used to stand up pretty much all around the track. So, I learned how to sit down a little bit, especially in supercross, and learn how to plant the bike a little better. I see a lot of Instagram comments of people blaming a lot of my crashes on him, but it was all on me.

As far as Chad, he came down and rode at Tyla Rattray’s where I ride. It was more just me being able to ride with him. I can confirm he can still go fast in the whoops! It was cool to ride with him and just kind of being around those guys is cool. They have so much experience. With me lacking a little bit, it’s cool to get that side of it. Thankful to have them in my past, but as of right now I’m just kind of doing my own thing. It’s been my dad and I and my trainer, Peter Park. It’s a good group and I’m happy with it for right now.

Just as a follow up to that, it looks like you have the bike set up now, probably how you wanted it at the start of the year. What’s the biggest takeaway you’ve learned in your first two years of supercross?

I would say in the 250 class, bike setup wasn’t such a worry. It was pretty easy to set up a 250. Going to the 450 class, you’ve got to learn what you can get away with, and also figure out how to ride those gnarly tracks and be safe on them. I definitely went downhill in supercross, and it wasn’t good in the middle of the season with just how I was feeling on the bike. I wasn’t comfortable, and it showed. I hit the ground a lot. Now it’s cool to feel like I kind of felt like I did on the 250. Overall, feeling good. We kind of have the bike working how I want to now. It’s not perfect, but I don’t think anyone’s is. So, just going to keep grinding.

Article: Jonathan McCready

Image: Doug Turney

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